Metal versus Asphalt Roofing

We've found a fantastic article that explains the fundamental as well as more subtle differences between metal and conventional asphalt roofing. We think it is incredibly informative and feel everyone should take the time to learn how these two materials differ aside from the obvious "metal or asphalt."

Feel free to let us know if you've got any questions here, we'd love to help you make a decision about your next roofing upgrade.

https://www.builderonline.com/products/building-materials/roofing-showdown-metal-vs-asphalt_o

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471 Hits

Solar Roofing Tiles

Over the weekend the owner of Tesla, Elon Musk, announced a revolutionary new roofing product: solar shingles.

These shingles could potentially power your entire home and create enough energy, if stored in a home battery, to remove you from the grid for good.  Check out the article here:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/markrogowsky/2016/10/29/here-comes-the-sun-elon-musk-wants-to-raze-the-roofing-industry

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482 Hits

Roofing Companies Helping Veteran

We just wanted to share this incredible story about some roofers in Texas helping out our veterans!

https://www.statesman.com/news/news/local/roofing-companies-pitch-in-for-round-rock-veteran/nsNkT/

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517 Hits

5 Kinds of roofing shingles to choose from

It’s important to consider the pros and cons of several different types of roof shingles and the relative cost of each roofing material, as well as consult with a local roofing contractor to determine which shingles work best for your house and in your part of the country. Here’s a look at some commonly used roofing materials:

1. Asphalt shingles — Generally the most frequently used, asphalt shingles are relatively inexpensive. Plus, if you purchase coated asphalt shingles, they may meet the Energy Star standards for a cool roof and earn you a rebate. Three-tab asphalt shingles are thinner and slightly less expensive than laminated or architectural asphalt shingles. And though they tend to be less expensive, asphalt shingles have a relatively short life span of 20 to 30 years.

2. Tile shingles — These shingles have a unique appearance characteristic of the Southwest states and colonial Spanish architecture. Tile shingles are some of the most expensive to purchase and install, but also are one of the longest-lasting and durable materials on the market, lasting more than 50 years. However, The National Roofing Contractors Association cautions that some homes might not be able to structurally support the weight of tile shingles.

3. Metal roofs — Appropriate for homes with especially flat or steep rooflines, metal roofing can either be solid metal or constructed metal shingles. Low-end galvanized metal roofs are relatively inexpensive, but can last up to 50 years. Metal roofs are becoming a popular option in many areas of the country. Once seen largely in the Northwest and Rocky Mountain regions, metal roofs are making an inroad into the Midwest and southern United States.

4. Wood shingles — More expensive than asphalt, wood shingles are known to be more aesthetically appealing because of their natural appearance. If you choose a hardwood, such as cedar or redwood, the shingles should last at least 30 years and sometimes as long as 50 years.

5. Slate shingles — This material is especially popular in the Northeastern portion of the United States, because the slate from which the shingles are made is quarried there. These shingles are extremely durable, with a lifespan of up to 50 years. It’s not uncommon to find old farmhouses that are leak-free and still have their original slate-shingled roofs. If your budget doesn’t allow for real slate shingles, you can always consider a synthetic slate product, which has a similar appearance, but a slightly shorter life span.

Repost from: https://www.poconorecord.com/article/20160729/ENTERTAINMENTLIFE/160729511

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563 Hits

Installing a Drip Edge

Today we are going to take a little break from talking about insulation. Though I'm sure we will come back to it in the future, I think I've driven my point home with it for now. If you didn't catch it, insulation is MUY IMPORTANTE! If you don't have it, GET IT! If you don't have enough of it, GET IT! Ok, if you didn't get my point before, now you do!:)

Now, onto drip edge! We've talked about drip edge before, but today I want to talk about the installation of drip edge. Before I jump right on into it, I want to give a briefing on drip edge in case you forgot what it is. What you need to know about drip edge is that it will save you a lot of potential hazards and stress in the future. A roof should have a SLIGHT overhang for water runoff. If the overhang is too short, it can lead to rotted roof sheathing and fascia, stained siding, soil erosion, or flooded basements. Thus, here comes in the drip edge to prevent those problems!

To install the drip edge, you take the wide, flat part of the material and slip it under the first layer of roof shingles. The outer edge must be extended over the gutter. Then you're going to take roofing cement and secure the drip edge to the house. Apply a continuous bead of roofing cement along the top of the drip edge, then press firmly on the shingles to secure the drip edge. For safe measure, it's a good idea to secure the ends of the drip edge with short roofing nails. If you do this added measure, make sure the roofing nails are up under the shingles.

There are plenty of DIY videos and tutorials online on how to properly install a drip edge if are a visual learner or need to read more detailed instructions. If you're like many people, you're just going to leave this job to the professionals so you don't have to worry about climbing up a ladder and dealing with stuff on top of your roof. It's a risky situation! I hope you've learned a little more about drip edge and can see the importance of adding these extra touches to your roof in order to give yourself and your home added protection.

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723 Hits
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